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Ileostomy vs Colostomy: What is Their Difference?

What is the difference between ileostomies and colostomies? While the procedure of ileostomy vs colostomy may appear similar at first glance, they are certainly quite different. However, these two procedures can be the beginning of a new life for individuals with severe digestive issues. If you think you are one of them, consult your doctor to know more about the possible treatment for your condition.

The girl is ready to learn about the different ostomy procedures.

What is the difference between ileostomies and colostomies? While the procedure of ileostomy vs colostomy may appear similar at first glance, they are certainly quite different. However, these two procedures can be the beginning of a new life for individuals with severe digestive issues. If you think you are one of them, consult your doctor to know more about the possible treatment for your condition.

 

What is Ileostomy

An ileostomy is a surgical procedure where the doctor made an opening called a stoma. This opening connects the lower end of your small intestine called ileum to your abdominal wall. Through the stoma, the doctor stitched the lower intestine into place. You might be given a special pouch or called an ostomy bag that you will wear on the outside. This ostomy bag will gather the entirety of your digested food.

The doctor completed this procedure if your colon or rectum cannot correctly do the job.

In case your ileostomy is not permanent, a doctor will reconnect your intestinal tract within your body once healing happens.

On the other hand, a permanent ileostomy will allow the surgeon to bypass or remove your colon, rectum, and anus. This condition will require you to have a pocket that permanently gathers your waste products. It could be internal or external.

 

Why A Surgeon Perform an Ileostomy?

In case you have a digestive organ issue that you cannot treat with medications, you may require an ileostomy procedure. Perhaps the most well-known purposes behind an ileostomy are inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The two kinds of inflammatory bowel problem are ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease.

Ulcerative colitis has inflammation, blisters, and scarring yet includes the digestive organ and rectum.

Crohn’s disease can also incorporate any area of the digestive tract, from the mouth to the anus, to aggravation the lining with blisters and scarring.

Individuals with IBD will frequently discover blood and bodily fluid in their stool, and encounter weight loss, poor nutrition, and stomach pain.

Other issues that may require an ileostomy include:

  • intestinal congenital disabilities
  • rectal or colon cancer
  • Hirschsprung’s disease
  • an acquired condition called familial polyposis, in which polyps structure in the colon that can prompt cancer
  • injuries or accidents that include the intestines

 

Risks of ileostomy

Dangers that are explicit to ileostomies involve:

  • internal bleeding
  • a failure to assimilate enough supplements from food
  • harm to the surrounding organs
  • urinary tract, abdominal, or lung problems
  • an intestinal obstruction because of scar tissue
  • wounds that tear open or set aside an extended effort to mend

You may experience difficulty with your stoma. In case the skin around it is moist or irritated, you will struggle to get a seal with your ostomy bag. In this case, it can create a leakage. Your physician can recommend a medicated topical powder or spray to recover this troubled skin.

Some individuals carry their external pocket like a belt. If you use the belt too firmly, it can lead to ulcerative colitis problem.

Moreover, people may get confused between ileostomy vs colostomy, but the two procedures are entirely different.

 

What Is a Colostomy?

One of the differences between ileostomy vs colostomy is the surgical site. A colostomy is another surgical procedure to the abdominal wall. However, this procedure connects one end of the large intestine out through the abdominal wall. During this technique, the doctor diverted one end of the colon through a cut in the abdominal divider to make a stoma. Like ileostomy, a stoma is the opening in the skin, but you have to attach an ostomy cap to collect feces. Individuals with transitory or long-term colostomies have pockets appended to their sides where feces gather and can be effectively discarded.

This technique is always permanent, particularly in kids with congenital disabilities.

A colostomy can be the consequence of a few methods to address issues with the lower digestive tract. This procedure is also called bowel diversion therapy.

 

Why A Doctor Perform a Colostomy?

Surgeons performed colostomies as a result of issues with the lower bowel. They can correct some problems by briefly diverting stool away from the bowel. This condition is when surgeons used temporary colostomies to keep stool out of the colon.

If you have an infected colon, similar to colon cancer, doctors will recommend permanent colostomies. In this procedure, doctors may obliterate your colon.

Circumstances in which you may require a permanent colostomy incorporate:

  • an injury
  • a blockage
  • Crohn’s disease
  • ulcerative colitis
  • imperforate anus or other congenital disabilities
  • colorectal cancer
  • colonic polyps, which is additional tissue developing inside the colon that might be cancer or may transform into cancer
  • diverticulitis happens when little pockets in your digestive framework, called diverticula, become inflamed or infected.
  • irritable bowel disorder, which is a condition influencing the colon that causes looseness of the bowels, swelling, constipation, and pain in the abdominal part

 

Risks of a Colostomy

A colostomy is an effective medical procedure. Likewise, with any surgery, there are dangers of hypersensitive reactions to anesthesia and excessive bleeding.

This procedure also conveys these different dangers:

  • damage to other organs
  • an infection
  • obstruction of the colostomy
  • internal bleeding
  • a wound tearing open
  • problems from scar tissue
  • a prolapse of the colostomy
  • a hernia, which happens when an internal organ pushes through a powerless zone of muscle

Your physician can clarify your dangers, the dangers of the surgery, the possible complications, and the surgical procedure’s benefits.

 

Ileostomy vs Colostomy

While there are numerous similarities between colostomies vs ileostomies, the two methodologies are entirely different.

An ileostomy is a sort of ostomy where the surgeon brings some portion of the small intestine, otherwise called the ileum, to the surface. This procedure is most appropriate for individuals with colon cancer, Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis, or Familial Polyposis (FAP).

You can usually locate the ileostomy pocket on the lower right side of the patient’s stomach. The byproducts leave the body in fluid structure. The affected person does not have any power over the ostomy action and must, accordingly, wear an ostomy pouch consistently. The individual should exhaust the pack five to multiple times every day.

On the other hand, the doctor forms the colostomy from the large intestine, which is the digestive tract area that prompts the outside of the body. They perform this procedure on patients with diverticulitis, colon cancer, bowel obstruction, intestinal injury, paralysis, or congenital disabilities.

There are two principal types of colostomies, and each has an alternate situation. A transverse colostomy is on the top of the affected person’s stomach, while a descending or sigmoid colostomy is on the bottom left. The stool makes the body in a semi-strong structure, so the person has some power and can have an ostomy cap instead of wearing an ostomy pocket.

Colostomies and ileostomies can spare some people’s lives and enhance the quality of life in different conditions. If you have any concerns about ostomies, talk to your doctor.

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